/page/2

Rizal’s ‘Indolence of the Filipinos’

This is a link to an article that was published in The Inquirer on December 2007. This is a piece that elucidates Jose Rizal’s essay “Indolence of the Filipinos.” This article delivers a message through Rizal’s words of strong yet truthful observations of Filipinos. It also gives exposes a relevant similarity still in today.

Module 2: Impact of Spanish colonial policies to the development of Filipino Nationalism.

  • (900-1521) Pre-colonial to early Spanish colonial

Nationalism is something that everyone has. It is the emotion we get every time we think for our country. But there is a time when nationalism did not yet exist in the Philippines. It was the period of Spanish colonialism. The Filipinos before were all under control of the Spaniards and the Spaniards made sure that the Filipinos would never have the hope and will to be free. The Spaniards underestimated the Filipinos, the Filipinos developed nationalism and it was all because of the Spaniards themselves. But even though our country back then don’t have centralized government simply because of the geographic topography we still managed to have this lingering sense of nationality when the Spaniards came. We can’t say that Lapu-Lapu fought only for his pride and territory but also unconsciously he have this idea of love for his native land that we can say as a small form of nationalism. 

  • SPANISH PERIOD

 Spanish rule in those times which our country was colonized was indeed abusive. Many of its colonies were abused by taking their lands, natural resources and its wealth. The Spanish policies was made for the benefit of the colonizers rather than for the betterment of the Filipinos. It was all for the benefit of the Spaniards in such a way that even friars and the church had its way of influencing the government. Spanish rule maybe seen and felt all over the place back then when the guardia civil was all around with their guns unto them that really scared the people on those times. The greed of the friars upon land and wealth was also a huge factor for the Filipinos to be anguish with their government. Filipinos during those times were treated as if they were the unaccepted in their own country. Those who were rich and powerful were the only ones at least treated fairly. The church like what the accounts say, was abusive. Friars exploited in terms of overpricing tax collection. It was one of the reason for why the Filipinos developed grudge against the church. In addition, taxes and forced labor was strictly implemented that fill up the patience of those industrious Filipinos. These abusive and exploitative way of governing policies are the reasons why the Filipinos realized that there must be a change in the system, that they should be free, and that they needed independence. What truly sparked Filipino Nationalism was the idea that Filipinos were no longer in control of their own land, rather the Spaniards were the one ruling over them.

  • EVENTS THAT DEVELOP NATIONALISM

 There are different factors that helped to develop the sense of nationalism of those early Filipinos. Like the death of the 3 Secular priests (Gomez, Burgos, Zamora) because of false accusation that lead the Filipinos to think that the Spanish government was unreasonable for killing innocent people

The opening of the Philippines to the world market and the rise of the new social classes that became the agitators of the Spanish rule many of them were still living outside the country that makes them free to do what they want to do and there are free to oppose the government that time. Like the writings of those illustados and the newly established La Liga Filipina lead by Rizal and his comrades had a big effect on the development of the local Filipinos sense of nationalism.

Jean Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract and John Locke’s Second Treatise on Civil Government came to be as the model and the key for more nationalistic ideas to rise. Most of the ideas that they gathered was merely seen and understood by the so called Illustados that in the later part of the future became leaders of the Philippine Revolution.

 

“These impediments or hurdles to Filipino nationalism are roughly categorized as :
1. Tribal Mentality
2. Belief in Determinism and Immature Religion
3. Colonial Mentality and English as Medium of Instruction
4. Lack of Social Consciousness and Selfish Individualism
5. Existence of Private and Foreign Schools
6. Mis-education
7. Educational System and Lack of Critical Thinking
8. Lack of Common and/or Foreign Enemy   “


 

Module 3:A. “Rizal: an Issue on Language”

This post tackles the issue on language that the Filipinos are facing today, since most Filipinos are paying more attention of using English as their primary language rather than local languages. 

For Rizal, Filipinos must hone and develop their skills in Filipino languages since the “identity of being a Filipino” to some extent connected to language.

Our Mother Tongue
A poem originally in Tagalog written by Rizal when he was only eight years old

IF truly a people dearly love
The tongue to them by Heaven sent,
They’ll surely yearn for liberty
Like a bird above in the firmament.

BECAUSE by its language one can judge
A town, a barrio, and kingdom;
And like any other created thing
Every human being loves his freedom.

ONE who doesn’t love his native tongue,
Is worse than putrid fish and beast;
AND like a truly precious thing
It therefore deserves to be cherished.

THE Tagalog language’s akin to Latin,
To English, Spanish, angelical tongue;
For God who knows how to look after us
This language He bestowed us upon. 

AS others, our language is the same
With alphabet and letters of its own,
It was lost because a storm did destroy
On the lake the bangka 1 in years bygone.

Firstly, Language is a system of conventional spoken or written symbols used by people in a shared culture to communicate with each other. A language both reflects and affects a culture’s way of thinking, and changes in a culture influence the development of its language. This poem by Rizal discusses that language plays an indicator to the identity of a person. One of the line in the poem said that “One who does not love his native tongue is worse than a putrid fish”

If this is the case, what Rizal is emphasizing here is the importance of language as a part of the person. Language is part of culture, knowing one’s local language somewhat pays respect and shows a sense of nationalism. By knowing/carrying a certain language, he is also able to communicate with people who shares that same common language.

Looking at this closely, one of the issues during Rizal’s time was the loss of cultural importance, specifically the usage of Filipino languages. Since Filipinos were under the Spanish rule, most of them were forced to follow the Spaniards. Along the way, Filipinos were somehow losing their cultural identity as they slowly inherit the Spanish way of living and communicating. Instead of practicing and developing Filipino languages, people accustom themselves with foreign languages and somehow despises and ignores the local languages. Rizal faced this problem because the Philippines were under the Spanish. On the other hand, At present, we also face this issue as Globalization progresses. Most of the youth today would rather tend to ignore Filipino languages and  rather develop speaking and writing in English since it is the most widespread language. However, Rizal did not say not to use English or any other language, what he wanted was to prioritize Filipino languages and every Filipino should be good at it.

http://www.joserizal.ph/pm01.html

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2167073/Wikang-Filipino-At-Ang-Paghabi-Nito-Sa-Kamalayan-Ng-Mga-Pilipino

Mi Expedición: The First Filipinos

by Martin Arciaga

Of the different accounts on peopling of the Philippines, lots of theories mention about how uncivilized and back-tracked the first Filipino settlers are compared to inhabitants of other places and civilization. Barely clad in their bahagsand thin pieces of cloth, the first Filipinos are believed to be the Negritos. They were black, small and warlike according to the Inland Push theory and were believed to have relied on hunting and foraging for survival. The picture above from a Japanese explorer’s website shows a group of Negritos looking for frogs to eat. Their life was not as complex as other civilizations and everything was provided by their rich forests. Then waves of migration came next, different people from different places and races have reached the islands in groups until the last wave composed of the believed-to-be-civilized ones like Malays, Hindus, Arab-Persians, Chinese, etc. The Filipino (let’s call them Filipinos though the term was accounted after the islands was named Philippines by the Spaniards) race became more and more diverse. Intermarriages happened and the once Negrito-exclusive Filipino race expanded to include other oriental/Malay bloods. 

This is how the general Filipino race evolved and what constructs our Filipino gene. We were before nomadic tribesmen gifted with a rich environment and seemingly endless resources. Though seen rough and uncivilized by the westerners and other cultures, the firsts Filipinos are fascinating subjects and something to be proud of for me. In my opinion, they are no different with other civilizations for they have managed to extract the wonders and use of the environment. I am really fascinated with how these early settlers developed ways to survive in such a geologically-diverse and frenzy-weathered environment.

What strikes me is the simplicity of life before the coming of foreign colonizers and settlers. Life wasn’t as complicated as it is during the Spanish era and especially nowadays. Religion was pagan but that doesn’t mean that they were inhumane and uncommitted. They got to find the meaning of life through everyday experiences with nature and their tribesmen. I do believe that even before the established religion, there is already a sense of pakikipag-kapwa among us. Also, people know how to respect, take care and not to abuse the environment. For them, nature is life as it is the provider of everything.

I am not really captivated by the peopling itself, by the way the Filipino race has evolved but with the manner these people have managed to become efficient, skillful, well-off and surviving in such an unpredictable, vast and life-challenging environment. 

wannadesigntheworld:

There’s no Weapon which can defeat my Pen

wannadesigntheworld:

There’s no Weapon which can defeat my Pen


Rizal Monument - one of the things that the Americans built in order to “immortalize” Rizal. 

Rizal Monument - one of the things that the Americans built in order to “immortalize” Rizal. 


Rizal Memorial Baseball Stadium - was named after Jose Rizal
It was discussed in Kaspil1 class that the Americans were in favor of Rizal as the National hero since he did not show any form of revolt against the Americans. Rizal was “immortalized” and proclaimed by the Americans as the Philippine National hero. In addition, there were several actions done by the Americans, such as: naming places, building monument to show that they support Rizal over Bonifacio or Aguinaldo as the national hero.
#Kaspil #Rizal

Rizal Memorial Baseball Stadium - was named after Jose Rizal

It was discussed in Kaspil1 class that the Americans were in favor of Rizal as the National hero since he did not show any form of revolt against the Americans. Rizal was “immortalized” and proclaimed by the Americans as the Philippine National hero. In addition, there were several actions done by the Americans, such as: naming places, building monument to show that they support Rizal over Bonifacio or Aguinaldo as the national hero.

#Kaspil #Rizal

chepaii:

photo was taken at rizaL museum in Fort Santiago, Intramuros.
these are Jose Rizal’s medical equipments for his optha profession.

chepaii:

photo was taken at rizaL museum in Fort Santiago, Intramuros.

these are Jose Rizal’s medical equipments for his optha profession.

Isang Anekdota ni Recto Ukol Kay Rizal

(An Anecdote of Recto’s to Rizal)

“Ang labanan sa  pagtubos sa inang bayan ay sinimulan ni Rizal sa larangan ng mga isipan.  Siya ang pangunahin sa paraang iyan. Ito’y hindi maitatanggi. Ngunit  huminto siya roon, hindi siya nanaog sa buhanginan pagaka’t ayaw ni  Rizal na matigmak ito sa dugo ng kanyang mga kababayan.”  Claro M. Recto, 1958

No direct translation in English is currently available. But Recto emphasized how badly Rizal wanted reform without spilling blood especially of his countrymen. Rizal used the pen instead of the sword as many of my previous history teachers put it. The book in the background, as anyone might have guessed by now, is an original version (copyright around late 1890’s) of the Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) which supposedly tried to divulge the the way the Spanish authorities used aristocracy in running the Philippine colony.



karlobenson:
©karlobenson (photo) 
I took this photo while on an accidental trip at the Fort Santiago with JoanCay in the walled city of Intramuros, Manila. 29 August 2010.

Isang Anekdota ni Recto Ukol Kay Rizal

(An Anecdote of Recto’s to Rizal)

“Ang labanan sa pagtubos sa inang bayan ay sinimulan ni Rizal sa larangan ng mga isipan. Siya ang pangunahin sa paraang iyan. Ito’y hindi maitatanggi. Ngunit huminto siya roon, hindi siya nanaog sa buhanginan pagaka’t ayaw ni Rizal na matigmak ito sa dugo ng kanyang mga kababayan.”  Claro M. Recto, 1958

No direct translation in English is currently available. But Recto emphasized how badly Rizal wanted reform without spilling blood especially of his countrymen. Rizal used the pen instead of the sword as many of my previous history teachers put it. The book in the background, as anyone might have guessed by now, is an original version (copyright around late 1890’s) of the Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) which supposedly tried to divulge the the way the Spanish authorities used aristocracy in running the Philippine colony.

karlobenson:

©karlobenson (photo) 

I took this photo while on an accidental trip at the Fort Santiago with JoanCay in the walled city of Intramuros, Manila. 29 August 2010.

Rizal’s ‘Indolence of the Filipinos’

This is a link to an article that was published in The Inquirer on December 2007. This is a piece that elucidates Jose Rizal’s essay “Indolence of the Filipinos.” This article delivers a message through Rizal’s words of strong yet truthful observations of Filipinos. It also gives exposes a relevant similarity still in today.

Module 2: Impact of Spanish colonial policies to the development of Filipino Nationalism.

  • (900-1521) Pre-colonial to early Spanish colonial

Nationalism is something that everyone has. It is the emotion we get every time we think for our country. But there is a time when nationalism did not yet exist in the Philippines. It was the period of Spanish colonialism. The Filipinos before were all under control of the Spaniards and the Spaniards made sure that the Filipinos would never have the hope and will to be free. The Spaniards underestimated the Filipinos, the Filipinos developed nationalism and it was all because of the Spaniards themselves. But even though our country back then don’t have centralized government simply because of the geographic topography we still managed to have this lingering sense of nationality when the Spaniards came. We can’t say that Lapu-Lapu fought only for his pride and territory but also unconsciously he have this idea of love for his native land that we can say as a small form of nationalism. 

  • SPANISH PERIOD

 Spanish rule in those times which our country was colonized was indeed abusive. Many of its colonies were abused by taking their lands, natural resources and its wealth. The Spanish policies was made for the benefit of the colonizers rather than for the betterment of the Filipinos. It was all for the benefit of the Spaniards in such a way that even friars and the church had its way of influencing the government. Spanish rule maybe seen and felt all over the place back then when the guardia civil was all around with their guns unto them that really scared the people on those times. The greed of the friars upon land and wealth was also a huge factor for the Filipinos to be anguish with their government. Filipinos during those times were treated as if they were the unaccepted in their own country. Those who were rich and powerful were the only ones at least treated fairly. The church like what the accounts say, was abusive. Friars exploited in terms of overpricing tax collection. It was one of the reason for why the Filipinos developed grudge against the church. In addition, taxes and forced labor was strictly implemented that fill up the patience of those industrious Filipinos. These abusive and exploitative way of governing policies are the reasons why the Filipinos realized that there must be a change in the system, that they should be free, and that they needed independence. What truly sparked Filipino Nationalism was the idea that Filipinos were no longer in control of their own land, rather the Spaniards were the one ruling over them.

  • EVENTS THAT DEVELOP NATIONALISM

 There are different factors that helped to develop the sense of nationalism of those early Filipinos. Like the death of the 3 Secular priests (Gomez, Burgos, Zamora) because of false accusation that lead the Filipinos to think that the Spanish government was unreasonable for killing innocent people

The opening of the Philippines to the world market and the rise of the new social classes that became the agitators of the Spanish rule many of them were still living outside the country that makes them free to do what they want to do and there are free to oppose the government that time. Like the writings of those illustados and the newly established La Liga Filipina lead by Rizal and his comrades had a big effect on the development of the local Filipinos sense of nationalism.

Jean Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract and John Locke’s Second Treatise on Civil Government came to be as the model and the key for more nationalistic ideas to rise. Most of the ideas that they gathered was merely seen and understood by the so called Illustados that in the later part of the future became leaders of the Philippine Revolution.

 

“These impediments or hurdles to Filipino nationalism are roughly categorized as :
1. Tribal Mentality
2. Belief in Determinism and Immature Religion
3. Colonial Mentality and English as Medium of Instruction
4. Lack of Social Consciousness and Selfish Individualism
5. Existence of Private and Foreign Schools
6. Mis-education
7. Educational System and Lack of Critical Thinking
8. Lack of Common and/or Foreign Enemy   “


 

Module 3:A. “Rizal: an Issue on Language”

This post tackles the issue on language that the Filipinos are facing today, since most Filipinos are paying more attention of using English as their primary language rather than local languages. 

For Rizal, Filipinos must hone and develop their skills in Filipino languages since the “identity of being a Filipino” to some extent connected to language.

Our Mother Tongue
A poem originally in Tagalog written by Rizal when he was only eight years old

IF truly a people dearly love
The tongue to them by Heaven sent,
They’ll surely yearn for liberty
Like a bird above in the firmament.

BECAUSE by its language one can judge
A town, a barrio, and kingdom;
And like any other created thing
Every human being loves his freedom.

ONE who doesn’t love his native tongue,
Is worse than putrid fish and beast;
AND like a truly precious thing
It therefore deserves to be cherished.

THE Tagalog language’s akin to Latin,
To English, Spanish, angelical tongue;
For God who knows how to look after us
This language He bestowed us upon. 

AS others, our language is the same
With alphabet and letters of its own,
It was lost because a storm did destroy
On the lake the bangka 1 in years bygone.

Firstly, Language is a system of conventional spoken or written symbols used by people in a shared culture to communicate with each other. A language both reflects and affects a culture’s way of thinking, and changes in a culture influence the development of its language. This poem by Rizal discusses that language plays an indicator to the identity of a person. One of the line in the poem said that “One who does not love his native tongue is worse than a putrid fish”

If this is the case, what Rizal is emphasizing here is the importance of language as a part of the person. Language is part of culture, knowing one’s local language somewhat pays respect and shows a sense of nationalism. By knowing/carrying a certain language, he is also able to communicate with people who shares that same common language.

Looking at this closely, one of the issues during Rizal’s time was the loss of cultural importance, specifically the usage of Filipino languages. Since Filipinos were under the Spanish rule, most of them were forced to follow the Spaniards. Along the way, Filipinos were somehow losing their cultural identity as they slowly inherit the Spanish way of living and communicating. Instead of practicing and developing Filipino languages, people accustom themselves with foreign languages and somehow despises and ignores the local languages. Rizal faced this problem because the Philippines were under the Spanish. On the other hand, At present, we also face this issue as Globalization progresses. Most of the youth today would rather tend to ignore Filipino languages and  rather develop speaking and writing in English since it is the most widespread language. However, Rizal did not say not to use English or any other language, what he wanted was to prioritize Filipino languages and every Filipino should be good at it.

http://www.joserizal.ph/pm01.html

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2167073/Wikang-Filipino-At-Ang-Paghabi-Nito-Sa-Kamalayan-Ng-Mga-Pilipino

Mi Expedición: The First Filipinos

by Martin Arciaga

Of the different accounts on peopling of the Philippines, lots of theories mention about how uncivilized and back-tracked the first Filipino settlers are compared to inhabitants of other places and civilization. Barely clad in their bahagsand thin pieces of cloth, the first Filipinos are believed to be the Negritos. They were black, small and warlike according to the Inland Push theory and were believed to have relied on hunting and foraging for survival. The picture above from a Japanese explorer’s website shows a group of Negritos looking for frogs to eat. Their life was not as complex as other civilizations and everything was provided by their rich forests. Then waves of migration came next, different people from different places and races have reached the islands in groups until the last wave composed of the believed-to-be-civilized ones like Malays, Hindus, Arab-Persians, Chinese, etc. The Filipino (let’s call them Filipinos though the term was accounted after the islands was named Philippines by the Spaniards) race became more and more diverse. Intermarriages happened and the once Negrito-exclusive Filipino race expanded to include other oriental/Malay bloods. 

This is how the general Filipino race evolved and what constructs our Filipino gene. We were before nomadic tribesmen gifted with a rich environment and seemingly endless resources. Though seen rough and uncivilized by the westerners and other cultures, the firsts Filipinos are fascinating subjects and something to be proud of for me. In my opinion, they are no different with other civilizations for they have managed to extract the wonders and use of the environment. I am really fascinated with how these early settlers developed ways to survive in such a geologically-diverse and frenzy-weathered environment.

What strikes me is the simplicity of life before the coming of foreign colonizers and settlers. Life wasn’t as complicated as it is during the Spanish era and especially nowadays. Religion was pagan but that doesn’t mean that they were inhumane and uncommitted. They got to find the meaning of life through everyday experiences with nature and their tribesmen. I do believe that even before the established religion, there is already a sense of pakikipag-kapwa among us. Also, people know how to respect, take care and not to abuse the environment. For them, nature is life as it is the provider of everything.

I am not really captivated by the peopling itself, by the way the Filipino race has evolved but with the manner these people have managed to become efficient, skillful, well-off and surviving in such an unpredictable, vast and life-challenging environment. 

wannadesigntheworld:

There’s no Weapon which can defeat my Pen

wannadesigntheworld:

There’s no Weapon which can defeat my Pen


Rizal Monument - one of the things that the Americans built in order to “immortalize” Rizal. 

Rizal Monument - one of the things that the Americans built in order to “immortalize” Rizal. 


Rizal Memorial Baseball Stadium - was named after Jose Rizal
It was discussed in Kaspil1 class that the Americans were in favor of Rizal as the National hero since he did not show any form of revolt against the Americans. Rizal was “immortalized” and proclaimed by the Americans as the Philippine National hero. In addition, there were several actions done by the Americans, such as: naming places, building monument to show that they support Rizal over Bonifacio or Aguinaldo as the national hero.
#Kaspil #Rizal

Rizal Memorial Baseball Stadium - was named after Jose Rizal

It was discussed in Kaspil1 class that the Americans were in favor of Rizal as the National hero since he did not show any form of revolt against the Americans. Rizal was “immortalized” and proclaimed by the Americans as the Philippine National hero. In addition, there were several actions done by the Americans, such as: naming places, building monument to show that they support Rizal over Bonifacio or Aguinaldo as the national hero.

#Kaspil #Rizal

chepaii:

photo was taken at rizaL museum in Fort Santiago, Intramuros.
these are Jose Rizal’s medical equipments for his optha profession.

chepaii:

photo was taken at rizaL museum in Fort Santiago, Intramuros.

these are Jose Rizal’s medical equipments for his optha profession.

Isang Anekdota ni Recto Ukol Kay Rizal

(An Anecdote of Recto’s to Rizal)

“Ang labanan sa  pagtubos sa inang bayan ay sinimulan ni Rizal sa larangan ng mga isipan.  Siya ang pangunahin sa paraang iyan. Ito’y hindi maitatanggi. Ngunit  huminto siya roon, hindi siya nanaog sa buhanginan pagaka’t ayaw ni  Rizal na matigmak ito sa dugo ng kanyang mga kababayan.”  Claro M. Recto, 1958

No direct translation in English is currently available. But Recto emphasized how badly Rizal wanted reform without spilling blood especially of his countrymen. Rizal used the pen instead of the sword as many of my previous history teachers put it. The book in the background, as anyone might have guessed by now, is an original version (copyright around late 1890’s) of the Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) which supposedly tried to divulge the the way the Spanish authorities used aristocracy in running the Philippine colony.



karlobenson:
©karlobenson (photo) 
I took this photo while on an accidental trip at the Fort Santiago with JoanCay in the walled city of Intramuros, Manila. 29 August 2010.

Isang Anekdota ni Recto Ukol Kay Rizal

(An Anecdote of Recto’s to Rizal)

“Ang labanan sa pagtubos sa inang bayan ay sinimulan ni Rizal sa larangan ng mga isipan. Siya ang pangunahin sa paraang iyan. Ito’y hindi maitatanggi. Ngunit huminto siya roon, hindi siya nanaog sa buhanginan pagaka’t ayaw ni Rizal na matigmak ito sa dugo ng kanyang mga kababayan.”  Claro M. Recto, 1958

No direct translation in English is currently available. But Recto emphasized how badly Rizal wanted reform without spilling blood especially of his countrymen. Rizal used the pen instead of the sword as many of my previous history teachers put it. The book in the background, as anyone might have guessed by now, is an original version (copyright around late 1890’s) of the Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) which supposedly tried to divulge the the way the Spanish authorities used aristocracy in running the Philippine colony.

karlobenson:

©karlobenson (photo) 

I took this photo while on an accidental trip at the Fort Santiago with JoanCay in the walled city of Intramuros, Manila. 29 August 2010.

Module 2: Impact of Spanish colonial policies to the development of Filipino Nationalism.
Module 3:A. “Rizal: an Issue on Language”

About:

The site is a collective blog that aims to tackle the questions from Kaspil1 Modules: 1, 2, and 3. through blog posts: both original and reblogged posts from contributors.

Module 2: Impact of spanish Rule/colonial policies to the development of filipino nationalism, stages of nationalism, events and factors that helped the development of Filipino nationalism.

Module 3: Choose 1 problem that was already present during Rizal's time which you think is still a problem today. (political, economic, social, cultural). Discuss the natures/causes of the problems during Rizal's time and compare the problem today. how did the problem change or develop? discuss the issue/problem. What were Rizal's answers to these problems during his time? can Rizal's philosophy and writings help us answer these problems today. use Rizal's works and writings as your main sources.


KASPIL S18 Term 1 2010-2011
TH 9:40-11:10
GROUP 1

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